Category Archives: High Noon

High Noon Playtest Session 3- The Secret at the Variss Industries Refinery

Last session we left off with the players going to the Three-legged Dog Saloon to get some food and sleep before heading to the Variss Industries Refinery.

Players

  • A scout that can move silently, has a badass rifle, and knows nature and shit (Tyler)
  • And a gunslinger who’s quick on the draw (Kevin)
  • A voodoo practicing Knight of Faith (Liam- who was visiting from NJ)
  • A snake oil salesman who’s 65, but doesn’t look a day over 25 Cult of Personality (Sammie)
  • A “I’m an evil warlock” sorcerer (Chad)

Not Present

  • A pugilist that has fists of fury (Nate)
  • A grumpy, pushy shaman(Angie)
  • A Showman who is trained in the etiquette of the West, motherfuckers! (Amelia)

Heading Out for Adventure

The group awoke in the AM after getting a good night sleep feeling refreshed and lovely (and more importantly 2 HP back).  The then went to the Oddity House to see if they could procure something to heal them in the coming battle.  The owner of the shop was an older Chinese man named Shen who welcomed to the shop and offered them needed supplies to fight evil, like garlic, salt, etc.

The group cut right to the chase and said they were there to rid the town of the green fog and need stuff to aid them in the fight.  Shen reached under the counter and put down two vials filled with a red liquid, a torch, and a small ring (and yes, one of my players made a “one ring to rule us all…?” joke).  Shen explained that the vials would restore health and vitality to a person, the torch once light, was ever-burning and wouldn’t ever go it.  It gave off no heat, and would not catch things on fire, but always provided light.  The ring was a minor enchantment that would block one single magical spell before becoming just an ordinary ring.  The group attempted to haggle, but failed, and in the end Tyler and Sammie each took a healing potion and bid Shen farewell.

Let the Lead Fly

The group made it to the outskirts of town and met up with the Sheriff, Janey “One-eye” and her friend, a voodoo practicing Knight of Faith.  Introductions were made and the group set off to the Variss Industries refinery.

 

Reactor

 

The refinery was made of a sinister-looking black metal, much like that of Cold Smoke City, with a big VI over a cog painting on the door.  Before the group could get to the door, they were attacked by two insideout zombie men.  Kevin took quite a bit of damage and from one of the guys, taking him for 20 HP to a whopping 8.  He was hurting.

Aside: In this game I am using my variant rule for HP:  roll 1d6+1 add your Con Score and Con Modifier- that’s your starting HP (unless your a fighting class- roll 2d4+1 instead of 1d6).  Everyone started off with around 13-19 HP… Then I lowered the boom on them.  When they gain a level- they only gain +1 HP per level… that’s it.  I designed this so a shotgun to the face will hurt you regardless of level.

After dispatching the two insideout zombie men, Tyler searched the area and found a backpack of one of the men.  It had a torch, some bullets, a light pistol, and a penny dreadful (Liam’s character became obsessed with Penny Dreadfuls and searched every room, high and low, for more).

The group went into the refinery and headed right and came to a staff lunchroom.  There were bodies all over the floor and two insideout zombie men.  On the far side of the room was a staircase leading up.  The group let lead fly and took down the baddies like cake.

The most amusing piece of this fight was one of the zombies, Tyler, and Kevin all had the same initiative score and went at the same time.  The zombie rolled a one on it’s attack, Tyler hit, and Kevin scored a critical success.  So it played out that the creature went to attack, slipped in blood and smacked its head on the table, bouncing back up- Tyler shot a hole through the things shoulder, spinning it around, and Kevin blew the back of the thing’s skull out with a well placed (and timed) shot.  The group looted the room and went up stairs.

On the second floor they found the foreman’s office, with the body of the foreman (sans head) inside.  Liam found a Penny Dreadful (yay), and the group found gold and a golden flask with an engraving of a person drinking liquid from the flask.  Kevin opened the flask and took a sniff; it was whisky.  Kevin took a health drink of it- damned tasty whisky.  He put the flask in his pack.

The group went to the end of the hall and saw a closed door with the words, “John Tundstill- operator of Variss Industries New Mexico Sector” on the door.  Sammie kicked the door in, the group ready for a fight.  The door handle turned fiery red and shot out- hitting Sammie.  Her clothes instantly ignited (as did everyone else as they were all packed tightly by the door).  After taking a bit of damage and putting out their flaming asses, the group wandered into the room and started poking around.

The room had a large desk, a safe, a closet (closed), and a bookcase.  On the desk were two pieces of paper.  The first was handwritten and was from someone in Spring Water only identified as “J” speaking of the fresh batch of slaves that would arrive from the Remnants of the United States in a months time.

Aside: We are playing in a Weird West setting of my own creation that I’ll be publishing after High Noon comes out.  In it the world has collapsed and the United States is basically only the east coast and has barricaded itself behind a great iron wall, stretching from Pennsylvania to Maine.  Anyone can be a slave in the setting- race doesn’t play a factor.  Also Indentured Servitude is very much alive and well in the setting.

The second piece of paper was a telegraph speaking to Mr. John Tundstill from Variss Industries.  It was complimenting him on his efficiency with getting ore from the mines.  Second it addressed a telegraph that Tundstill had sent, speaking of a strange artifact found in one of the mines.  The telegraph told Tunstill to lock it up and keep it safe and VI would send an expert to examine it.

The group then found a secret passage behind the bookcase- a spiral staircase leading up to the third floor.  Finally they opened the closet door and found John Tundstill hiding in there with a gas mask on.  After the group removed the mask (upon which he freaked out-fearful of the gas) and was beaten for a bit- he told the group that they found a large circular stone tablet in a lower mine- the area seemed to have been delved long ago (but how could that be?!), and VI sent a sorcerer to examine the tablet…  After he arrived that’s when the green fog started to appear- coming from the tablet itself.  The group asked where this sorcerer was and Tundstill pointed a shaking finger at the spiral staircase.

The group then beat on him some more and made him open the safe.  In the safe they found a deed to a piece of property in Cold Smoke City, $200, a ruby, and a gun of red metal with a black handle.  On the bullet cylinder was an etching of a demon blowing flames from their mouth.  The group threatened John and he readily explained how the gun works.

The Gun of Demon Flame: 1d6+1 damage; Rate of Fire 2; 6 shots; Range 30′; After a successful attack, the wielder can will the bullet to explode (wielder must succeed a Saving Throw).  The target is instantly ignited in flame, taking an additional 1d6 damage.  Each round the target takes 1d6 fire damage until they put out the flame or die.

Kevin took the gun, Tyler took the deed, Sammie took the ruby, and the rest of the money was divided evenly.  The group buffaloed Tundstill, tied him up, and threw him back in the closet.

Upstairs into the Lair

The group went upstairs and found a door covered in green slime.  Opening the door they found a man wearing robes standing over a large circular tablet.  He cackled, “OH GOOD!  MORE PEOPLE HAVE COME TO PLAY!”

Sorcerer

The group opened up on the sorcerer and thanks to two critical attacks, dropped him before anything else could be done.

The group was celebrating, giving each other high fives and hugs when the stomach of the sorcerer bloated and became overlarge, finally exploding in a spray of guts, bone, and blood.  Rising from the hole in the body of the sorcerer was a foul and hideous looking demon.

Demon

The group group all succeeded their fear saving throws (thanks to burning Luck points) and combat began.  This was a brutal fight.  Nearly everyone was at 1-3 HP by the end and that was after having to use a Luck point for a second wind (half max HP back- once per session).

During this fight Chad and Kevin both rolled several critical failures; Chad shooting Liam with a shotgun and Kevin getting whipped across the room by the demon.

Finally Kevin got in a couple lucky shots with the Gun of Demon Flame (but couldn’t succeed on the flame effect- not that it would have harmed the demon) and dropped the baddie.

The group found an amulet around the charred remains of the sorcerer and Chad took it.  The group looked at the tablet; it was ancient and had carvings and etchings that seemed to be Mayan in origin.  Liam dumped three vials of holy water on the tablet, which shattered and broke.  Sammie took a piece of it and put it in her backpack.

The group grabbed John Tundstill, Janey One-eye saying he had a date with a Hangman’s Judge.  The group was given a voucher for $100 to either the gunsmith, blacksmith, or the Oddity shop and $50 cash.

With that we ended for the night.  We will play again sometime in January.  This was a great session and I got to see just how deadly High Noon is…  which makes me happy.

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High Noon Playtest Session 2- Investigating Around High Noon

Session Two

Players

A grumpy, pushy shaman(Angie)

A Showman who is trained in the etiquette of the West, motherfuckers! (Amelia)- I haven’t put this Weird class on the blog
A scout that can move silently, has a badass rifle, and knows nature and shit (Tyler)
And a gunslinger who’s quick on the draw (Kevin)

Not Present

A “I’m an evil warlock” sorcerer (Chad)

A pugilist that has fists of fury (Nate)

Spring Water

Town of Spring Water

When we ended session one, the group staggered into the town of Spring Water battered, bloodied after their bout in the abandoned mine.  They ran into Sheriff One-Eye Janey outside of the Three-legged Dog Saloon and Inn.  She greeted them cordially enough, but warned them to stay out of trouble in her town.  With a deep inhale from her cigar, she sauntered off to the Sheriff’s Office in the distance.

The group made their way into the Three-legged Dog Saloon and bought some whisky.  Amelia went to the broken down piano and started playing Old Susana (link) while Kevin and Angie drank (Angie testing how the bartenders would react to having a Native as a customer- they didn’t seem to mind).

After some palaver about the town, the group found out about some of the troubles in Spring Water.  Many of the folks didn’t take kindly to Variss Industries coming from Cold Smoke City and taking over their land and building an ore refinery plant on the outskirts of town.  Also that the strange green fog that was turning people inside out was coming from the valley where the refinery resided.  The tavern owners also informed them to steer clear of the Judge O’Mallery, for he is a hangman’s judge (can dispense justice without trial and he is extremely firm).

The group then went to the Sheriff’s Office to confirm what they heard at the tavern.  After a lengthy conversation, Sheriff One-eye Janey told them to go rest up and she’d have a small posse assembled in the AM.

With that we ended for the evening.

Note about this session: this was a fun info gathering session, but it was very low energy.  Several of the players were extremely tired after work and long days, the session didn’t start until 7:15pm instead of 6pm and I called it at 8:30 because I could tell people were too tired to keep playing- and it made sense for a stopping point there. 


High Noon Art and The Showman Weird West Class

High Noon Pic

High Noon is coming along quite nicely!  The above picture was done by the talented Alex Mayo and is the first piece of art for High Noon.

I’ve begun layout for the book and making my edits.  Angie (my wife) still needs to do her round of edits as well- but she’s busy doing Hubris art right now.

I figured this would be a good time to post the last class of High Noon- The Showman

The Showman

Magicians, ringmasters, actors, flimflam men, and the like may fall into the category of the showman.  Where the cult of personality uses their natural ability and eloquence to negotiate and bend others to their will, the showman uses their strange magical abilities to ensnare and trick those around them.

The showman commands respect and awe of the crowds, but knows how quickly it can all turn against them.  They live for thrill of the crowd, seeking fame and fortune, but also constantly live in fear of failure and being forgotten.

Weapon Restrictions: A showman is proficient with pistols, shotguns, knives, and swords.

Prestidigitation: The showman is able to do minor illusions tricks.  This ability allows the showman to perform simple magical effects for one hour.  These effects are extremely limited, such as slowly lifting up to 1 point of material, cleaning an area of 1 cubic foot per round, chill, warm, or flavor 1 pound of food or water, or create small illusions such as floating bubbles, shimmering butterflies, change the color of a person’s clothing, etc. These always look artificial and can never be mistaken for actual creatures, dyes, etc.  A showman can use this ability three times per day.

Fascinate: The showman begins speaking of grand times and adventures!  Any target that can see or hear the showman within 60’ must make a saving throw or become enthralled with the showman, unable to look away, suffering -4 to all skill checks (such as Perception).  Being attacked or in danger automatically breaks this effect.  This effect lasts for as many rounds as the showman keeps speaking.  A showman can use this magical effect once per day.

Illusionism: The showman is able to use magical abilities to awe and ensnare those that watch and hear them.  The showman knows that the crowd can quickly turn against them should they fail to proper use their abilities.

A showman is able to cast a number of spells equal to their showman level.  To cast a spell the showman chooses which spell they want to cast and then makes a base saving throw.  If the ST is successful, the spell goes off without a hitch.  Should the ST fail, the spell fizzles and the showman loses the ability to cast any spells until they sleep for night.

If the showman critically fails on the saving throw, the showman becomes dejected and worries about failure.  For all future charisma-based rolls (including saving throws) for the next 24 hours, the showman rolls 2d20 and takes the lower of the two.

Learning Spells: A showman begins play with two spells of their choice and gains an additional spell with each level they gain.

Luck Points: A showman is able to burn a Luck Point to automatically succeed on the saving throw to cast a spell.

Saving Throws: A showman receives +2 to saves against attempts to influence them or cloud their minds.

XP Bonus for Charisma: A showman with a Charisma score of 13 or 14 receives a 5% experience bonus, and those with a score of 15 or higher receive a 10% bonus.

Literate: A showman can read and write their native language.

Skills: A showman begins play with 3 skills.

Starting Gear: Horse, lantern, lantern oil x2, trail rations x5, water canteen, clothing and hat (fine quality), cutlass (D: 1d6, R: NA, RoF: NA), and light pistol (D: 1d6, R: 25’, RoF: 2, S: 6) with 15 bullets.

Melee weapon info is as follows: Weapon (Damage (D): X, Range (R): X, RoF: X) 

Ranged weapon info is as follows:  Weapon (Damage (D): X, Range (R): X, Rate of Fire (RoF): X, Shots (S): X)

Starting Currency: 4d6 x 10 dollars.

 

The Showman Level Progression
Level XP HP BAB ST
1 0 HP Option +0 15
2 2,500 +1 HP +0 14
3 5,000 +1 HP +1 13
4 10,000 +1 HP +1 12
5 20,000 +1 HP +2 11
6 40,000 +1 HP +2 10
7 80,000 +1 HP +3 9
8 160,000 +1 HP +3 8
9 320,000 +1 HP +4 7
10 640,000 +1 HP +4 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Showman Spells

 

Cause Fear: The showman speaks words of panic and terror to a target with less than 5HD (or levels) within 60’ and cause them to experience absolute terror.  The target must make a saving throw or become panicked and flee from the sorcerer for 1d4+1 rounds.

 

Charm Person: The showman uses their ability for oration and speaks a soothing word to a target, ensnaring their mind, and making the target treat the showman as an ally and friend.  The target will do whatever the showman asks, but will not obey harmful or suicidal orders; giving such an order breaks the enchantment immediately.  The target is allowed a saving throw to avoid this effect.  The spells duration is 1 hour per showman level.

 

Dancing Lights:  The showman can create up to four lights of varying colors (they will even change color periodically, should the showman wish).  These lights are spherical and have the brightness of a lantern.  These lights must stay within 10’ of one another or the effect ends immediately.  These lights can float up and down, around corners, or into tight spaces- all at the direction of the showman.  These lights can go up to100 feet away from the showman.  Only one version of this spell can be active at a time.

 

Disguise Self/Other:  You are able to wrap yourself (or another target) up in illusions and make yourself, including your belongings, look different.  You can appear up to 1 foot shorter or taller, thinner, fatter, or medium build.  You can change your hair, eye color, teeth, gender, voice, etc.  This feels real to the touch to others, however the showman or the affected target do not have the memories or mannerisms of who they are trying to impersonate (unless they have created a new looking person entirely).  People that the disguised target is attempting to fool receive a saving throw (or perception check) with a +2.  This effect lasts for 1 hour.

 

Emotional Control: The showman is able to affect a group of targets in a 20’ radius up to 100’ away.  The showman is able to amplify emotions or mute them.  This can stop people from fighting, or cause a simple dispute to erupt into a brawl.  The happy will begin to cry, the sad and grieving to become elated.  All targets in the area are allowed a saving throw to negate this effect.  Targets cannot be effected by Emotional Control more than once in a 24 hour period.  This effect lasts as long as the showman maintains control and 1 round after concentration ends.

 

Glitterdust: The showman summons a cloud of golden sparking flecks that covers everything in a 10ft radius. The targets must make saving throw versus spell or be blinded for the duration of the spell. The spell also visibly outlines invisible targets for the duration of the spell. The dust cannot by removed by any means until they fade away at the spells end.  This spell lasts one round per showman level.

 

Hallucinatory Terrain: The showman is able to affect a 50’ radius within a 400’ range of natural terrain to look, sound, and even smell like a different type of natural environment.  Structures, equipment, and creatures in this area are not changed.  Targets are allowed a saving throw to disbelieve.  This spell lasts a number of turns equal to the showman’s level.

 

Hypnotic Pattern: The showman creates a dazzling display of lights and colors that swirl, twist, and glow right next to them as they speak and tell stories of the wonders of the plains.  Any creature within 30’ of the display must succeed a saving throw or become utterly enthralled for 2d6 rounds.  They will not move, attack, speak, or react.  They are utterly immobile and fixated on the pattern.  Attempting to cause the targets harm will immediately break this enchantment.

 

Image: The showman creates a visual illusion of an object, creature, person, or force within 400’.  This illusion can speak, create sound, have a smell, and even texture.  The creature understands speech and can reply, but with extremely limited answers and knowledge (all based from the showman’s own experiences).  This illusion lasts as long as the showman concentrates and two rounds thereafter.  The illusion can move within the confines of the effected area (400’).

 

Inspire: The showman speaks words of excitement and glory to their comrades, granting them a +2 bonus to saving throws and skill checks for the next hour.

 

Invisibility: The showman is able to turn themselves (or another touched target) invisible.  The target cannot be attacked unless the attacker knows the invisible person’s exact location.  Should a target swing blindly at the invisible person, their attacks suffer   -4.  If the invisible person attacks, the spell is broken immediately.  The spell lasts until the showman dispels the effect.

 

Mad Hallucination:  The showman is able to affect the minds of up to four targets that are within 5’ of one another.  Surfaces swim, spin, and tilt.  Targets must succeed on a saving throw or become uneasy, moving at half their normal rate and suffering -2 on all physical actions for a number or rounds equal to the showman’s level.

 

Smooth Talker: The showman becomes more attractive and enticing.  Their charisma is increased to 18 for the duration of this spell and they roll 2d20 on all charisma checks and take the higher of the two.  This spell lasts a number of rounds equal to the showman’s level.

 

Swollen Tongue: The showman causes the tongue of a touched target to swell, making so they cannot talk intelligibly.  They sputter, can barely breathe, and have a bulging mass protruding from their mouth.  This effect lasts for 2d3 rounds.

 

Ventriloquism:  You can make your voice seem to appear far away (up to 50ft away) or even nearby, say over a guard’s shoulder.  Targets are allowed a saving throw to disbelieve this illusion.  It lasts for a number of turns equal to the showman’s level.


High Noon Playtest- Session One- Heading to Spring Water

Last night we began playtesting my High Noon rules, inspired and compatible with (mostly) the kickass White Star rules.  My group made their characters.

All in all it took 4o minutes to make characters- this was because I didn’t have print outs, etc (my printer is fucked), so I had a single iPad that I passed around so people could write down their starting gear.

As I went to the players and pointed out their starting gear, I told the ones that started with a horse to ignore that- they don’t need it.  One of the players decided to barb me, “Fuck you!  This says I get a horse…  Your rules say I get a horse, I’m taking the horse!”  Several other players thought it was a good time to join in and give me shit, “Yeah!  I get a horse too… we ALL should get horses, this is the Old West!”  I said fine- you all get your fucking horses… (more on this later).

Setting

I do not include a weird west setting in High Noon- I give tool for quick ideas, but also figure people may use High Noon to play in Deadlands, Sixthgun, fuck- even East to West (really use my book and White Star together).  So I gave my wife the choice of which setting we’d play in- Deadlands, Malifaux, or Cold Steel Reign.  Gave her the elevator pitch of each and it was between Deadlands and Malifaux (Cold Steel Reign is written by an old friend of ours but it’s extremely dark- very dark ages meets the Old West)… So we BS’d the pros and cons of each (I love my woman) and we decided on Deadlands- then she turns to me and says, “Why don’t you write your own setting and publish it later?”  Well fuck… so NOW I’m researching and writing notes for that…

Anyways- I digress

The Players

Weird West

Here’s the cast-

A grumpy, pushy shaman (Angie)
A “I’m an evil warlock” sorcerer (Chad)
A Showman who is trained in the etiquette of the West, motherfuckers! (Amelia)- I haven’t put this Weird class on the blog
A pugilist that has fists of fury (Nate)
A scout that can move silently, has a badass rifle, and knows nature and shit (Tyler)
And a gunslinger who’s quick on the draw (Kevin)

For HP I’m using my second method- roll 1d6+1 add your Con Score and Con Modifier- that’s your starting HP (unless your a fighting class- roll 2d4+1 instead of 1d6).  Everyone started off with around 13-19 HP… Then I lowered the boom on them.  When they gain a level- they only gain +1 HP per level… that’s it.  I designed this so a shotgun to the face will hurt you regardless of level.

 

Heading to Spring Water

Zombie art

The group is heading to the desert town of Spring Water in the New Mexico territory. There are rumors of strange goings on in the town; a green fog that was turning people inside out and drove them to kill their fellow villagers… The Church of Divine Providence had it on their bounty board and the group took it.  They each got paid $2o up front and the rest after they fix the problems and report to the Spring Water Church priest.

So they wandered through the desert for eight days, encountering no problems.  With the view of Spring Water in the horizon all was smooth sailing.  Until… the ground collapsed under them.  Eventually they come to in an abandoned mine, battered and bruised, and dead horses all around them- yeah, fuck those whiny bitches- I killed their horses- I told them they didn’t need them;).

The group dusted themselves off- Angie the shaman butchered one of the horses (she said it was spite butchering for the killing of her horse) and took some raw horse meat, and they began delving into the mine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

First floor of the mine

First floor of the mine

The first floor went pretty smoothly- they got in marching order and meandered into the second room and got ambushed by the spiders.  I rolled for shit for both of them and the group killed them quickly- Angie putting an arrow into the eye of one and Tyler rifling another one.

The third room the group was looking around and about to head through the exit to the top floor (with a spider above it, lying in wait in the darkness).  Tyler- cutting his chops on Red Box (and haven’t played any of the editions above 1e- come to think of it, I don’t think he’s played in about 20 years…) said I really look around the room.  Yes!  I described the room in more detail and the  how at the entrance had webbing on the rock-face, starting light at the bottom, but getting thicker at the top.  Now they knew a spider was up there.  They threw rocks to lure it down.  It crawled down and jumped at Nate, missing.  Chad successfully casting Flaming Hands on it.  The spider turned tail and ran down the tunnel, but Tyler rolled a natural 20- blasting the things abdomen to bits.  The spider, parts of its body still alight, like the slowly dying embers of a fire, slid into the darkness.

Aside: This is why I love old school RPGage.  The group was engaged and asked for details in the room.  With 3.x and Pathfinder- too often the players would get into a room and do the what does my Notice roll tell me.  Much more engaging to have them actually ask for details- only if shit is hidden should there even need to be a roll- and even then if the players say they are looking closely (or long enough) a roll probably isn’t needed.

The Second Floor

Top floor of the mine

Top floor of the mine

The second floor the group encountered the rats eating the corpse of an insideout man- the first sign/evidence that indeed shit was fucked up in the town of Spring Water.  The group used rocks to scare off the giant rats (they failed their morale roll).

In the room to the north the group encountered the slaughtered settlers and four inside out men.  All four ran at the characters.  Kevin and Amelia took 6 damage each, and Angie had two on her, resulting in 3 damage (one missed).  Kevin won initiative and shot is heavy pistol- he killed the one on him, turned his pistol on one on Angie and gunned it down with Fast Shootin’ (think Fighter’s cleave ability), gunned one down on her and then shot the other one (Heavy Pistol has a RoF of 2), but missed.  Amelia used her cutlass and killed the one attacking her and Tyler used his knife to gut the last one on Angie.

Combat was quick and now the group was worried because two of them took substantial damage.

They cleared the rest of the rooms, eventually coming to the Foreman’s Office, looted the safe and Amelia read the newspaper, dated three years ago: “Spring Water mine to close due to lack of ore.  Variss Industries to found new mine and processing plant soon”  The group found this interesting as they had found plenty of evidence that there was still ore in the walls AND that they had started digging four new tunnels.

The group went out the mine entrance, paused to see the carnage of the dead settlers and wagon.

Tyler- Is there a horse?

Me- Yup!

Tyler- Is it alive?

Me- *I held up a d6*- Even or odd?

Tyler- Odd

Me- *rolls a 2* It’s dead.

Tyler- *laughs*- You’re a dick.  I’m gonna get me a fucking horse!

Then, saying fuck it to burying the dead- the group finished the walk to Spring Water.

Spring Water

The group arrived in the town, saw the sign for the Three-Legged Dog Saloon and Inn, and decided to take their blood, filthy hides there to get whisky and a bath.  Leaning against the wall of the saloon was a woman in brown leather duster and a black cowboy hat.  She lit a cigar and looked at the group, revealing she wore an eye patch.

Sheriff Janey "One-Eye" Hooper

Sheriff Janey “One-Eye” Hooper

Janey- Well… ain’t you cusses a dirty sight on the eye…

The group paused and looked at her as she took a deep drag of her cigar.  The she moved her duster lapel and flashed her Sheriff’s badge.

Janey- Who the hell are you and what brings you to my town?

To be Continued

This was a great session.  We left off here (an hourish) early because I could tell several of the players were tired (myself included).  The next session will be in the first week of December

Spring Water Map

So I used the Vornheim die drop generator to create Spring Water.  Then I delved into some of my old blog posts and used my Instatown idea to flush out the buildings.

So here is the player’s map and then my master map.Town of Spring Water

 

 

 

Master map

Town of Spring Water- Master Key


High Noon- First Draft Complete- Here’s the Bestiary From the Weird West Chapter

Well High Noon first draft is FINALLY done!  Yeehaw!! uumm…  Yeah that was disturbing… sorry.

Anyways- I still want to write two or four one page adventures that will go in the book.  I will do one or two true Western adventures and then the same for Weird West.  High Noon will now get shelved for the next couple of weeks as I delve full bore into Hubris now that the Kickstarter is over.  Once I get what I need to do to move the project further down the rails to completion I will come back to High Noon as well as my White Star book (which is also very nearly complete).

Anyways- I thought I’d post the Bestiary for the “But I Want it Weird” chapter.

Here are the Weird Classes: Knight of Faith, Shaman, Sorcerer, and Weird Scientist.  Oh and if you want to come back from the dead- well here’s that too.

Bestiary

The Weird Bestiary

The Weird West is made weird, not only by people possession strange powers and inventing bizarre gizmos, but by the horrific monsters that wander the plains or lurk in the shadows of a boomtown.  Below are a few examples of monsters that may be encountered in a Weird West campaign.

 

Definitions

Hit Dice (HD): This determines the number of Hit Points an enemy has.  It is important to note that this number will change depending on which Hit Point option your group is using (pg XX).  If the number has a +# after it, this represents additional HP; 3HD+2 means 3 Hit Dice (see options below) plus an additional 2 HP.

 

Hit Point Option 1- The Gritty: Enemies/NPCs all start with 11 HP, this represents 1 HD.  Each additional HD equals +1 HP.  Example: 3HD Bandit leader has 13 HP.

Hit Point Option 2- The Not as Gritty: Enemies/NPCs all start with 18 HP.  Each additional HD equals +1 HP.  Example: 3HD Bandit leader has 20 HP.

Hit Point Option 3- The Traditional:  This represents the number of Hit Dice a GM rolls, then adds up the total to generate the enemy’s Hit Points.  Example: To get the HP of a 3 HD Bandit leader, the GM rolls 3d6, resulting in a 6, a 4, and a 2.  The Bandit leader has 12 HP.

 

The number of HD an enemy has also represents their Initiative and Base Attack Bonus.  A 5HD creature gains +5 to Initiative and +5 to attack.  Note: If you are using the optional Group Initiative rule (pg XX), then do not factor the HD into the enemy’s initiative.

 

Weapon (Damage) (W (D)): This is the amount of damage the bite or claws of a creature will do.  If it is a weapon, such as a gun, that info can be found in the equipment chapter (pg XX-XX).

 

Armor Class (AC): This is the base number needed to hit a target.  Armor class is explained in more detail on page XX.

 

Special (S):  This is any special info or abilities the enemy may have.  This could be the tracking skill of the bounty hunter, the enhanced smell of a mountain lion, or the poison of a rattle snake’s bite.

 

Movement (MV): This is how fast a target moves in one round.

 

Saving Throw (ST): This is the target number an enemy must roll equal to or above to succeed a saving throw.  To figure out a creature’s ST, start at 19 and subtract their HD.

 

Experience (XP): Players gain experience from killing, capturing, or subduing an enemy.  Consult the experience table below for how much XP an enemy is worth.  There is also an experience chart for enemies for the Weird West in Chapter 6: But I Want it WEIRD, pg XX-XX.

 

Experience Table
HD Experience Earned
1 15
2 30
3 60
4 120
5 240
6* 400
7* 800
8* 1,000
9* 1,200
10* 1,400

 

*= by and large if your group is playing a gritty old west game, most enemies will not go above 5HD.  Enemies and creatures that are 6 to 10 HD should be the tough hombres that utilize are members of the classes outlined in Chapter 2 pg XX-XX.

 

Weird Creatures

 

Alien, Brute

HD: 3; W (D): Ray gun (2d6), Claws (1d6+1); AC: 14; S: Invisibility, Enhanced eyes, Track, Nano-healing; MV: 30; ST: 16; XP: 60

 

Brute aliens are keen hunters and are on earth looking to kill us for sport or to gather us up as slaves (or possibly a food source).  A Brute alien has enhanced eyes, and it is impossible to blind them in any way (even with spells) or sneak up on them.  A alien brute has the Track skill.  A favored tactic of the brute alien is to turn invisible and sneak up on prey.  A brute alien can use Invisibility as often as they like, however electricity damage shorts out the device for 1d4 hours.  Once per day a alien brute can inject healing nanites into their system as a free action, restoring half their HP.

 

Alien, Psi

HD: 2; W (D): Ray gun (2d6); AC: 12; S: Spells; MV: 30; ST: 17; XP: 30

 

Psi aliens have grey, slimy skin, three long fingers, and large shimmering eyes and a bulbous head.  They come from beyond the stars and are looking to study and enslave us.

 

A psi alien is able to use the following sorcerer spells (pg XX-XX): Cause Fear, Charm Person, Darkness, Freedom of Movement, Invisibility, Mage Armor, Magic Missile, and Tongues.

 

A psi alien is able to cast three of these abilities per day.  If desired a psi alien can cast more, but increase their HD by one, reduce their saves, and increase their XP award. 

 

Alien, Tech

HD: 3; W (D): Ray gun (2d6); AC: 12; S: Gadgets; MV: 30; ST: 16; XP: 60

 

Tech aliens come from far, far away and are here to study the Earth and its inhabitants.  This can be for benevolent reasons or perhaps they are simply looking for natural resources to plunder.

 

A Tech alien has four inventions from the Weird Scientist gadgets (pg XX-XX) on them.

 

Demon, Lesser

HD: 2; W (D): Claws (1d6), Bite (1d6-1), Tail (1d6-2); AC: 10; S: Blister Fever, Immunity, Heat; MV: 30; ST: 18 XP: 30

 

Lesser demons are the slaves of Hell.  These despicable creatures do the bidding of demons and greater demons.  They range in height from 2’ to 5’ high, are usually hairless and covered in warts and blisters.

 

A lesser demon can make two attacks per round between two claws, biting, and their tail.  A lesser demon radiates heat, making it uncomfortable to be around them, but it does not cause damage.  All demons are immune to any fire based damage, natural or magical.  A target that is struck by a lesser demon must succeed a ST or develop painful blisters on their flesh.  These blisters make it painful to move, reducing movement speed by 10’ per round and causing all physical actions to suffer -2.  This malady lasts for one month before clearing.  Holy water does 1d6+2 damage to a lesser demon and they must succeed a ST or be stunned for 1d4+1 rounds.

 

Demon

HD: 6; W (D): Claws (1d6+1), Bite (1d6), Tail (1d6-1); AC: 14; S: Immunity, Heat, Fly, Flame, Possession; MV: 30; ST: 13 XP: 400

 

Demons are fearsome creatures.  Demons revel in death, decay, and chaos.  Demons are usually 6’-8’ tall, have large claws and fangs, bat-like wings, and a barbed tail.

 

A demon can make two attacks per round between two claws, biting, and their tail.  A demon’s tail has a reach of 10’.  A demon radiates searing heat, causing 1 point of damage per round to all who are within a 5’ radius.  All demons are immune to any fire based damage, natural or magical.  A demon also ignores 2 points of damage from all sources save magical spells, abilities, or items.  Demons are able to fly at a rate of 40’/rnd, cast flaming hands three times per day, and once per day take possession of a target.  When a demon attempts to posses a target they receive a ST.  If successful the demon vanishes, becoming incorporeal, and their consciousness takes over the individual.  The demon has access to any knowledge and abilities of the target.  If the subject is harmed, the demon suffers no damage.  The demon occupies the host body for 1d4 rounds.  After that the subject is allowed a new save each round to attempt to eject the demon.  Holy water does 1d6+1 damage to a demon and they must succeed a ST or be stunned for 1d3+1 rounds.

 

Demon, Greater

HD: 10; W (D): Claws (2d6), Bite (1d6+2), Tail (1d6+1); AC: 14; S: Immunity, Heat, Fly, Flame, Darkness, Possession; MV: 30; ST: 9 XP: 1,400

 

Greater demons, often called Demon Lords, are masters of Hell and pain.  Greater demons command demons, lesser demons, and even undead such as skeletons, zombies, and sometimes even vampires.  Greater Demons are usually 7’-10’ tall, have large claws and fangs, bat-like wings, and a barbed tail.

 

A demon can make two attacks per round between two claws, biting, and their tail.  A greater demon’s tail has a reach of 15’.  A greater demon radiates searing heat, causing 2 point of damage per round to all who are within a 5’ radius.  All demons are immune to any fire based damage, natural or magical.  A greater demon also takes half damage from all sources save magical spells, abilities, or items.   Demons are able to fly at a rate of 40’/rnd, cast Flaming Hands (pg XX) three times per day, Darkness (pg XX) once per day, and twice per day take possession of a target.  When a demon attempts to posses a target they receive a ST.  If successful the demon vanishes, becoming incorporeal, and their consciousness takes over the individual.  The demon has access to any knowledge and abilities of the target.  If the subject is harmed, the demon suffers no damage.  The demon occupies the host body for 3d4 rounds.  After that the subject is allowed a new save each round to attempt to eject the demon.  Holy water does 1d6 damage to a greater demon and they must succeed a ST or be stunned for 1d3 rounds.

 

Ghost

HD: 4; W (D): Touch (1d6-1); AC: 16; S: Drain, Immunity, Horror; MV: 30; ST: 15; XP: 120

 

Ghosts are the bitter, vengeful spirits of the dead.  They linger in areas of decay and sorrow, or where they were killed or buried.  Not all ghosts are evil or violent; some want to talk or seek help to put them to rest.

 

The touch of a ghost is deadly and siphons the life from a target.  Each time the touch of a ghost lands, the target must succeed a ST or be drained of 1d3 Constitution (permanently).  Once per day a ghost can issue a horrific scream (as Cause Fear, pg XX).  A ghost is immune to all damage save for magic and magically charged items and weapons.  Holy water will damage a ghost for 1d6+1 points of damage.

 

Nightmare

HD: 3; W (D): Hooves (1d6), Bite (1d6-1); AC: 12; S: Smoke, Flame Breath, Fear Aura, Immunity; MV: 60; ST: 16; XP: 60

 

The Nightmare is a horse bred in the pits of Hell; their mane and hair around their hooves are dancing flames, their teeth are needle-like, their eyes burn and churn like hot magma, and sulfuric steam issues from their nostrils.  They are vengeful, malicious spirits that enjoy causing harm and chaos.  They often times will equally maligned humans ride on their back.

 

The ground beneath a nightmare wilts and scorches and will ignite if it stays still long enough.  When in combat a nightmare prefers to start by issues flames from its nose (as Flaming Hands, pg XX), igniting its foes, then it uses its fear aura (as Cause Fear, pg XX) and then A nightmare can use these abilities once per hour.

 

Skeleton

HD: 1; W (D): As weapon; AC: 10; S: Undead, damage reduction; MV: 30; ST: 18; XP: 15

 

These reanimated skeletal remains of a human or animal.  These creatures are mindless and tend to follow the orders of an evil sorcerer or diabolical creature.  Skeletons are undead and are immune to poisons and fear effects (except turn abilities) and take half damage from any source except magic and bludgeoning.

 

Vampire, Lesser

HD: 2; W (D): As weapon, claws (1d6-1), bite (1d6-2); AC: 12; S: Regen, Sunlight Weakness, Undead, damage reduction, Immunity, Call of the Night; MV: 30; ST: 17; XP: 30

 

A lesser vampire is a human that has recently been embraced by a vampire.  A lesser vampire is not a strong as their older kin.  A lesser vampire regains 1 hit point per hour and is restored to full HP after resting in their coffin for the day.  A vampire is immune to fear effects (except for turn abilities) and ignores 1 point of damage except from magic.  Once per night a vampire is able to call to the night for aid, summoning a wolf or 1d4 bats to aid them in combat.  A lesser vampire that is in sunlight for more than two rounds is instantly destroyed.  A vampire can be repelled by religious objects held by true believers.  Holy water deals 1d6 damage to a vampire.

 

If a vampire is reduced to zero HP they become a lifeless corpse.  The only way a vampire can truly be destroyed is to put a stake in their heart and cut off their head.

 

Vampire

HD: 4; W (D): As weapon, claws (1d6), bite (1d6-1); AC: 13; S: Regen, Sunlight Weakness, Undead, damage reduction, Immunity, Charm Person, Call of the Night; MV: 120; ST: 15; XP: 120

 

A vampire is a human that was embraced by a vampire in the last century. Vampires are agile and cunning hunters.  A vampire regains 1 hit point every round and is restored to full HP after resting in their coffin for the day.  A vampire is immune to fear effects (except for turn abilities) and ignores 1 point of damage except from magic.  Once per night a vampire is able to call to the night for aid, summoning a 1d3 wolves or 2d4 bats to aid them in combat.  A vampire can use Charm Person (pg XX) once per day.  A vampire that is in sunlight suffers 1d6 damage per round, if they are reduced to zero HP from sunlight damage, they are destroyed.  A vampire can be repelled by religious objects held by true believers.  Holy water deals 1d6 damage to a vampire.

 

If a vampire is reduced to zero HP they become a lifeless corpse.  The only way a vampire can truly be destroyed is to put a stake in their heart and cut off their head.

 

Vampire, Master

HD: 7; W (D): As weapon, claws (1d6+1), bite (1d6); AC: 14; S: Regen, Sunlight Weakness, Undead, damage reduction, Immunity, Charm Person, Gaseous Form, Invisibility, Call of the Night; MV: 800; ST: 12; XP: 15

 

A master vampire is a human that was embraced by a vampire about 250-500 years ago. Vampires are agile and cunning hunters.  A master vampire regains 2 hit points every round and is restored to full HP after resting in their coffin for the day.  A vampire is immune to fear effects (except for turn abilities) and ignores 2 point of damage except from magic.  Once per night a vampire is able to call to the night for aid, summoning a 1d6 wolves or 3d4 bats to aid them in combat.  A master vampire can use Charm Person (pg XX) twice per day, cast Invisibility once per day, and is able to turn into a gaseous form for up to an hour twice per day.  Transforming into this fog takes one round, as does reverting to their natural form.    A vampire that is in sunlight suffers 1d6 damage per round, if they are reduced to zero HP from sunlight damage, they are destroyed.  A master vampire cannot be repelled by religious objects held by anyone other than mystically powered religious figures (IE Knights of Faith and Shamans).  Holy water deals 1d6-1 damage to a master vampire.

 

If a vampire is reduced to zero HP they become a lifeless corpse.  The only way a vampire can truly be destroyed is to put a stake in their heart and cut off their head.

 

Vampire, Ancient

HD: 10; W (D): As weapon, claws (1d6+2), bite (1d6+1); AC: 16; S: Regen, Sunlight Weakness, Undead, damage reduction, Immunity, Charm Person, Gaseous Form, Invisibility Call of the Night; MV: 30; ST: 9; XP: 1,400

 

An ancient vampire is a horrific foe that is cruel, bloodless, and powerful.  They were embraced by a vampire over 500 years ago and resemble human with bestial bat-like traits than their younger kin.  Ancient Vampires are agile and cunning hunters.  A ancient vampire regains 3 hit points every round and is restored to full HP after resting in their coffin for the day.  A vampire is immune to fear effects (except for turn abilities) and ignores 3 point, even from magic.  Once per night a vampire is able to call to the night for aid, summoning a 3d2 wolves and 3d4 bats to aid them in combat.  An ancient vampire can use Charm Person (pg XX) three per day, cast Invisibility twice per day, and is able to turn into a gaseous form for up to an hour as often as they like.  Transforming into this fog takes one round, as does reverting to their natural form.  An ancient vampire that is in sunlight suffers 1d3 damage per round, if they are reduced to zero HP from sunlight damage, they are destroyed.  A master vampire cannot be repelled by religious objects held by anyone other than mystically powered religious figures (IE Knights of Faith and Shamans).  Holy water deals 1d3 damage to a master vampire.

 

If a vampire is reduced to zero HP they become a lifeless corpse.  The only way a vampire can truly be destroyed is to put a stake in their heart and cut off their head.

 

Wendigo

HD: 8; W (D): Claws (2d6), Bite (1d6+2); AC: 16; S: Corruption, Regen, Hysteria, Speed, Immunity; MV: 80; ST: 11; XP: 1,000

 

The Wendigo is a human that has become a cursed creature for practicing cannibalism.  The Wendigo is half-man half-beast creature that stalks the forests, staying near towns and villages, hoping to snag a wandering human.

 

Tales of the Wendigo speak of its speed and ferocity.  A Wendigo regains 2 HP per round and half damage from all sources save magical spells.  A Wendigo’s insatiable hunger makes it immune to any fear effects (even magical).  Once per day a Wendigo can let out a horrific bleating noise.  Targets in a 60’ radius must succeed a ST or become stunned and unable to move for 1d4 rounds.  Oftentimes a Wendigo will use this to paralyze a foe and then stalk off into the darkness.

 

The claws and bite of a Wendigo can cause a corruption to grow in a person.  After combat is over roll a secret ST for any character injured.  If they fail the ST they have developed Wendigo Psychosis and now crave human flesh.  Any time they are near a dead body or open wound they must succeed the urge to devour it. Successfully resisting three times (or being blessed by a Knight of Faith or Shaman to remove a curse) will break the curse.  If a character consumes human flesh they lose half of their Wisdom score (permanently).  The second time they consume human flesh, they wander into the wilderness and begin the painful transformation into a Wendigo.

 

Half Animal shape (roll 1d10)

1) Bear; 2) Deer; 3) Elk; 4) Moose; 5) Cougar; 6) Hawk; 7) Badger; 8) Wolf; 9) Snake; 10) A hybrid mix of two- roll twice

 

Werewolf

HD: 3; W (D): Claws (1d6+1); AC: 15; S: Regen, Silver Weakness, Unbridled Wrath, Scent, Surprise, Transmission; MV: 40; ST: 16; XP: 60

 

A werewolf is a person who has been cursed to transform into horrific half-man half-wolf beasts.  A werewolf stands roughly 6’ high and weights 200 or more pounds.  A werewolf has a strong sense of smell and has the Scent skill.  A werewolf attacks with a terrible ferocity, and is able to use the Unbridled Wrath ability (pg XX).  A werewolf regains 1 hit point back per round from any damage that is not silver.  A werewolf has a weakness to silver and takes full weapon damage from the source.  Damage from silver heals at a normal rate for a werewolf.  A werewolf has a 1-3 chance to surprise a target.  A person that is struck with a werewolf’s claws has a chance of contracting the disease.  See below.

 

Player Characters as Werewolves

After combat has been resolved roll a secret saving throw for the character.  If the roll fails, the character has contracted lycanthrope.  The afflicted character will transform into a werewolf at the next full moon.  Werewolves are ferocious beasts and will attack anything that they come across.  If the target(s) are close to the werewolf they are allowed to roll under their Wisdom score to avoid attacking, fleeing instead.

After the initial transformation the PC will always change on the full moon and be a beast for the whole night, until the sun rises.  When a PC is reduced to 50% of their hit points they must make a saving throw to avoid transforming into a werewolf (however they are allowed to forgo the ST and instead just transform into the creature).  When transformed due to any reason other than the full moon, the PC makes a save each hour to revert to their normal form.

 

Zombie

HD: 1; W (D): As weapon; AC: 10; S: Undead, damage reduction; MV: 20; ST: 18; XP: 15

 

Zombies are the reanimated rotting, fetid remains of a human.  Zombies are mindless and tend to follow the orders of an evil sorcerer or diabolical creature.  Zombies are undead and are immune to poisons and fear effects (except turn abilities) and take half damage from any source except magic.

 

Descriptions for Class-based Enemies

As stated in Chapter 5, feel free to use the classes as enemies as well, however it is recommended that this is reserved for high profile or important enemies and NPCs.  An evil Cult of Personality is using the word of god to enslave a town, but it’s his champion, an evil sorcerer that is really pulling the strings and putting true fear into the populace. The creepy mansion at the top of the hill is home to a Weird Scientist who is fascinated with stitching human bodies together in an attempt to create her perfect mate, etc.


The Revenant- Coming Back From the Dead in High Noon

Last night I started working on one of the last chapters of High Noon, “But I Want it Weird!”

I’ve previously posted some of the Weird classes you can find in this chapter.  The Weird Scientist, Sorcerer, Shaman, and Knight of Faith.

Last night I worked out some quick rules for cowpolk who decide that death just ain’t for them…

Coming Back From the Dead

Revenant 1

Sometimes a cowpolk has unfinished business.  When a PC (or important NPC dies) there is a chance they will rise from the grave to carry out their unfinished business.  Roll a d100 and if the result is 20% or lower (the GM is free to set the % chance even lower), the character rises from the grave as a revenant after 1d3 days.

 

A player is free to come up with their own reason of unfinished business.  This can be “kill the bastard that ended my life.” Or “bring down the gang that murdered my family.” Or even “Make sure my daughter marries the right man.”

 

Characters as a Revenant

Characters continue to gain levels as per their class descriptions, but no longer gain any Hit Points (or hit dice if the group is using Hit Point Option 3, pg XX).  While a revenant may not gain any further HP, they do ignore 1d4 points of damage from any source of damage.

 

Lost hit points do not recover at the normal rate for a revenant, instead taking twice as long (see Healing in Chapter 4, pg XX).  A revenant survives by drinking blood (this can be from a dead animal, person, etc.) and once per day regains 1d3 HP by doing so.  Revenants that don’t feed on blood once per day become emaciated and pallid looking.

 

No Soul

A revenant is immune to all diseases, poisons, and fear effects due to being an undead creature.  A revenant character starts with one less Luck Point per session than normal due to the unfortunate fact that they are dead.

 

Unfinished Business

When a revenant completes their unfinished business, it is time for that hombre to finally take a dirt nap and venture into the great unknown.  They are gone, make a new character.

 

Taking Too Long on Unfinished Business

 

Each month a revenant is walking among the living they must roll under their Constitution score.  Failure means that their body decays and they lose 1 point of Constitution permanently.  When a revenant is reduced to 0 in their Constitution their visage is horrifying and most likely townsfolk are coming after them with pitchforks, torches, and shotguns.  Success means the revenant does not decay further and retains their current visage (whatever that may be).

 

As a side note- the upcoming movie Revenant looks badass, totally gameable, AND will probably end up in the High Noon Appendix N.

Speaking of High Noon Appendix N… If you haven’t seen the Backwater Gospel animated short, do yourself a favor and watch it…


Fun in the Old West- Carousing in High Noon

Jeff’s Gameblog still has one of the best carousing tables in all the DIY RPG community.  I wanted to take inspiration from that and create a carousing table for High Noon.  I know players will want to get up to a crazy time when they are in town, blowing off steam.  Here you be.

High Noon Carousing

Saloon 1

Every cowboy needs to blow off some steam.  Carousing starts off “with just a few drinks”, but quickly escalates into a night of blackout debauchery, fun and activity.  Roll 1d6 to see which category of activity you engaged in, then roll 1d6 to see the result of what you did.

 

Carousing isn’t free.  Roll 1d6 x $20 to see how much you blew over the course of the night.  Should you have that amount of money on your character, you gain double the amount of money spent as XP.  If you don’t have that much money, you only gain the amount spent as experience and are now in debt with a less than reputable person who will come collecting in the next 1d3 days.

 

Saloon 2

Carousing: Drinking
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Roll 1d6 Activity
1 You make an ass out of yourself.  You suffer -2 to all Charisma rolls for the next 1d4 weeks while in town.
2 You were the life of the party and impressed everyone around you.  You gain +2 to all Charisma rolls for the next week.
3 You got into disagreement which quickly escalated into a drunken brawl.  You suffer 1d4 damage for your troubles and are now banned from the establishment for 1d12 months.
4 You hit the bottle hard.  You suffer -2 to all Physical rolls (including attack and saving throws) for 24 hours.
5 You accidentally set a building on fire.  Did anyone else see you do it?
6 Roll 1d4: Even) you wake up in your bed; Odd) you wake up in an alley way.  There is a dead body of a rival next to you, a knife in their gut.  What happened?

 

Poker

Carousing: Gambling
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Roll 1d6 Activity
1 You played some poker and won big!  You took a pot of $50x1d6 in cash.
2 You played poker and lost big!  You lost $50x1d6 in cash.  You can go into debt for this.
3 You were playing poker and caught one of the players cheating.  Roll 1d4- You: 1) shot and killed them in anger; 2) beat them senseless and took their money- gain $10x1d10; 3) got them thrown out by the saloon-keep; 4) Attempted to draw on them and got shot first, suffering 1d6 damage.  They were gunned down by another player.
4 You played some poker and broke even.
5 You played some faro and won 1 claim to a possible mine 2d3 days away.  Ground hasn’t been broke there yet.
6 You played some billiards and even) won $2d20; odd) lost $2d20.

 

Whorehouse

Carousing: Whoring
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Roll 1d6 Activity
1 You went to a piss-poor house of ill-repute and had some fun.  Lose $2d6.  Wake up hung over, but strangely refreshed.
2 You went to a piss-poor house of ill-repute and had some fun.  Lose all your money and wake up in an alley way.
3 You went to a common house of ill-repute and went a little crazy.  You owe $40 in wages and damages to the room.  You can go into debt on this.
4 You went to a common house of ill-repute and stopped a hooligan from roughing up one of the girls and instead beat him senseless.  You have the admiration and respect of all the girls.  You never have to pay for services here and they look to you as a protector.
5 You went to a fine house of ill-repute and had fun, a bath, and a meal.  You owe $25.00 for services.
6 You went to a house of ill-repute and after having fun, the prostitute tells you she’s frightened.  She heard two prominent men conspiring to kill the madam (and owner) and take over the business.  She has no where to turn.

 

 

Opium

Carousing: Opium
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Roll 1d6 Activity
1 You chase the dragon and become rather emotional and cause a scene.  You punched the sheriff for telling you to quiet down and keep calm.  You spend the night in jail and have a $25 fine.
2 You hallucinated and ended up stripping buck naked and running through the street, shouting about the end of days.  You were arrested and thrown in a cell.  You suffer -2 to all Charisma rolls for the next 1d4 weeks while in town and have a $10 fine.
3 You hallucinated and had a nice relaxing evening.  Wake up in a dry horse trough the next morning.
4 You passed out in the opium tent.  Someone stole all your money, belongings, and clothes.  No one say anything.
5 You became paranoid and attacked the proprietor of the opium den.  You are banned for 1d3 months!
6 You became paranoid and ran and hid under your bed for the evening and didn’t sleep. You suffer -2 to all rolls for 24 hours due to exhaustion.

 

Rodeo

Carousing: Rodeo
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

Roll 1d6 Activity
1 You bulldogged a steer successfully.  People are impressed with your skill.  +2 to Charisma checks in town for 1 week and gain $1d8.
2 You attempted to bulldog a steer and failed.  You were trampled.  You suffered 2d4 points of damage and take -2 to all physical rolls for 24 hours.
3 You rode a bronco and made it for 1d8 seconds!  You gain $1 per second.  If you rolled 8 you gain double the funds and people are impressed with your ability; +2 to Charisma rolls for 1 week.
4 You attempted to ride a bronco and got thrown immediately.  People mock your lack of skill; -2 to Charisma rolls for 1 week.
5 You offered help branding to the local rancher, unfortunately you used the brand of a competing ranch (where’d you find the brand?).  He’s furious with you and seeking punitive damages with the local judge.  You’ve made an enemy.
6 You attempted to ride a bull and were even) successful; odd) unsuccessful.  If you were successful, gain +2 to Charisma for 1 week and you’ve caught the eye of the local rancher’s daughter/son.  If you were unsuccessful, suffer 2d4 damage from being thrown and gored, and the local rancher is accusing you of hurting his prized bull.

 

 

Sheriff

Carousing: Other Activities
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

Roll 1d6 Activity
1 You participate in a boxing match.  You won!  Add an additional 1d6x$5 to your pocket.
2 You participate in a boxing match.  You lost!  Subtract 1d6x$2 from your pocket (you can go into debt for this).
3 You were beaten and robbed.  You are at 1 HP and lose all items.
4 You interrupted the wedding of the daughter of a prominent figure in town…  You’ve made a new enemy.
5 You successfully pocketed 1d6 items from the local general store.  Roll 1d12- You took: 1) soap; 2) matches; 3) compass; 4) hammer; 5) flask; 6) hat (common); 7) tobacco, chewing; 8) tobacco, smoking; 9) pocket watch, open-faced; 10) playing cards; 11) pocket watch, closed; 12) prospector’s pan.  You can take multiple of the same item.
6 You attempted to pocket 1d3 items from the local general store.  Roll 1d12- You attempted to take: 1) soap; 2) matches; 3) compass; 4) hammer; 5) flask; 6) hat (common); 7) tobacco, chewing; 8) tobacco, smoking; 9) pocket watch, open-faced; 10) playing cards; 11) pocket watch, closed; 12) prospector’s pan.  You can take multiple of the same item.  You were caught and arrested.  You owe an amount equal to what you stole + $25.  You have to do hard labor until the amount is paid off.